Syria crisis: How world community can help create awareness

By Izzud deen Redzuan

The on-going armed conflicts of more than four years in Syria have caused millions of their people to leave their homeland in search of a safe haven. The civil war in Syria has killed over 220,000 people, half of them are believed to be civilians and children.

Those who survived had to flee miles away from their homeland by taking chances and risking their lives. Some of them had managed to get to Jordan’s refugee camps, the Iraqi boarders, and Turkey. Some even took dangerous trips across the Mediterranean Sea to get to the European countries to seek for shelter and protection. Nevertheless, not all of them did make it across alive.

The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) has estimated that more than four million people, half of whom are children, have fled to neighbouring countries, and 7.4 million people are displaced internally within Syria, making it the largest exodus of refugees in more than two decades.

Despite of the ongoing conflict between the government of Syrian President, Bashar al-Assad and ISIS, the Syrian opposition forces, the basic necessities in Syria are thinly dispersed among its civilians such as medical care, shelter, food and clothing.

The unfortunate civilians also have a very limited move whereby the regime can point a gun and shoot at them at any time and even worse they dropped bombs at where people lived and hiding.

On the other hand, the Sunni’s young men are being persuaded by ISIS to join the fight against the regime and they kidnapped other minorities such as Christian believers. The fate of these victims are unlikely to be known until today.

Everyday, thousands of Syrians have wished to flee their country to seek a better place after seeing their neighbourhood being bombed or family members killed. This is because the risks on the journey to go abroad can be as high as staying.

The United Nations (UN) has predicted that there could be 4.27 million Syrian refugees by the end of 2015 and it’s actually the worst exodus since the Rwandan genocide 20 years ago.

Dear readers, millions of Syrians need our help. And the more people are aware of their plight, the more we can build a global response to reach them. There are a number of Syrian relief funds nowadays, most of them, I believed, are aimed at providing a better future for Syrians while nurturing their health and improving their well-being.***

Photo courtesy of United Nations World Food Programme

Izzud deen Redzuan

Former Managing Editor of IIUMToday 2014 - 2016, Best Undergraduate Researcher 2015 & Hamka Award 'Best Communication' Student for 33rd Convocation 2017.

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